LIFE SE ASIA MAGAZINE

By Saltysprays

saltysprays

Why is Hamilton Island attracting so much INTERNATIONAL attention lately? Most recently Taylor Swift hosted her Birthday Bash on the beautiful Island.

Well there are many reasons why celebrities are choosing to head down under to the tropical Whitsundays. I am going to share with you the Top 5 reasons why you should too….

  1. Whitehaven beach

Whitehaven beach is heaven on earth! It is absolutely breathtaking and an AWARD winning beach!  It happens to be situated on the largest island out of the 74 Islands in the Whitsundays.   It has brilliant white silica sand, among the purest in the world!

Access to Whitehaven beach can be achieved from Hamilton Island by boat (within 30 minutes) or you can splurge with a seaplane or helicopter ride to the beach. With most tours you can stay for a half a day or a full day.  I recommend exploring the Hill inlet where…

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SYDNEY’S SECRET GARDEN

by Flowers Blumen Fluer

Flowers ~ Blumen ~ Fleurs

WENDY WHITELEY AND THE SECRET GARDEN AT LAVENDER BAY

On Christmas Day 2015, after sharing lunch with my friend from Switzerland, we made our way to Lavender Bay to visit this unassuming peaceful Secret Garden. There are no signs announcing the Garden but we found it with ease. In sunshine and under blue skies we drank in the peacefulness of this place as we leisurely wandered the little winding pathways. There are benches and small tables and chairs along with rather interesting artistic sculptures, some from recycled materials. This was, for us, a rather unusual intimate look at the life of one who has chosen to channel her grief and rehabilitation from drug addiction to a serene place for all to share and enjoy.

These words from Wendy Whiteley appear beneath a photograph displayed on a board in the garden – “This is me, right at the beginning, in the…

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Little shop of horrors: the Australian plants that can kill you

By The Logical Place

The Logical Place

The Conversation

Ben Moore, Western Sydney University

Australia is so famous for its dangerous creatures that visitors often arrive fearful that everything that moves is out to get them. In a land where snakes, spiders, shells and even one of the iconic mammals – the platypus – can bite or sting, should we all be worried about plants as well?

Plants around the world produce a staggering diversity of chemicals and many of these are potentially toxic to animals including humans, sometimes even upon contact. Many of these toxins have evolved to protect plant roots, leaves and unripe fruits from being eaten by herbivores, particularly insects and browsing mammals.

Australia’s toxic plants are not terribly appealing or nutritious for humans. If someone is poisoned, it’s usually accidental, and many victims are curious children.

There are many historical records of plant poisoning in Australia involving early explorers and settlers who were…

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yourexoticworld

A Coffee Date in the Arabian Desert

FotorCreated

Ghana Chalan Al Dhaheri is a well renowned historian and researcher of Arabic culture and traditions, but there is another role that she enjoys most. She is also a master storyteller and her favourite story is always told over a cup of the world’s most loved beverage – coffee! Coffee is sacred to the Arabs! No trip to the United Arab Emirates (theEmiratei Kingdom which includes the world famous cities of Dubai and Abu Dhabi) will be complete without an experience of the traditional coffee ceremony of the Arabs, referred to as ‘Al-Qahwa or Gahwa’.

Mrs. Al Dhaheri tells us of the legend of Kali; the story that dates back centuries ago to the Ethiopian Highlands where the first coffee beans was discovered. Legend has it that an Ethiopian goatherd noticed his flock to be unusually lively after consuming some berries found in…

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Peter Does That Tourist Thing In Istanbul

Peter's Big Adventure

I’ve been traveling exclusively through Asia for the past year and a half, so why am I now going to Istanbul? It was a (relatively) cheap flight, and a close friend of mine offered me a free place to stay… so why the hell not?

It was about an 11 hour flight from Mumbai to Istanbul, so while I’m watching Pixar movies and drinking wine on Turkish Airlines, let me tell you a little bit about Istanbul, and Turkey.


Istanbul: Your Crash Course

Istanbul, formerly Constantinople, formerly Byzantium, is arguably one of the most historically important cities in the world. As such, it is a city with some serious history, to say the least. Over the course of the last 2 millennia, Istanbul served as the capital city for the Byzantine, Latin, Roman, and Ottoman Empires. Indeed, the city has always been of extreme strategic importance for the politics of…

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Peter Wraps Up India: The Train Post

Peter's Big Adventure

I would be so racist against Indian people by now if I hadn’t taken so many trains. In a place like India, my white skin makes me a huge target because of my perceived level of wealth. As such, most of the interactions I have with locals are about money, and the unfortunate majority of them are not positive. Traveling through this kind of environment, it’s easy to get cynical. My saving grace throughout my whole time in India was my time on the trains.

The trains are where I got to interact with some actual people; people that had no end game with me. When taking trains in India, I was nearly always crowded in with lots of people in a small space, but most of those people always spoke English, especially in the more expensive train classes. With only a negligible language barrier, I got on those trains a foreigner…

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Peter's Big Adventure

FAIR WARNING: This is not going to be a pleasant read. It’s going to be disturbing and R-rated. Now’s your chance to bail.

Mumbai’s Kamathipura is the oldest red-light district on the Indian subcontinent, and is the 2nd largest on the entire continent of Asia. The 1st largest is Calcutta, which is something that I didn’t realize when I was actually there. If I had I probably would have paid it a visit, like I’m about to do in Mumbai.

I have spent more than a year living in Southeast Asia, which is a region infamous for its sex tourism. In spite of this, aside from the occasional unsettling exchange with a “sexpat“, I didn’t have much experience with these sorts of things beyond the stories I heard from older people who had spent time in Thailand during the 1980s and 1990s. Those stories were…

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Pearl Habour

This was the start of WWII for America.   The lost of life was large but not compared to what was coming!  The Reason Japan bombed Pearl Harbor was to destroy the Battleships which at time was the principal ship for war.  Japan wanted the US Navy out of the way so Japan could invade SE ASIA and not able to stop Japans war with China. So in a way the start of war also for SE Asia as Japan attacked the Philippines just hours later but because of the time difference was on the 8th.

Attack on Pearl Harbor

The attack on Pearl Harbor[nb 4] was a surprise military strike by the Imperial Japanese Navy against the United States naval base at Pearl Harbor, in the United States Territory of Hawaii, on the morning of December 7, 1941. The attack led to the United States’ entry into World War II.

Japan intended the attack as a preventive action to keep the U.S. Pacific Fleet from interfering with military actions the Empire of Japan planned in Southeast Asia against overseas territories of the United Kingdom, the Netherlands, and the United States. There were near-simultaneous Japanese attacks on the U.S.-held Philippines, Guam and Wake Island and on the British Empire in Malaya, Singapore, and Hong Kong.[13]The attacks – from troop landings at Kota Bharu, Malaya, to the air attacks ranging geographically from Hong Kong to Pearl Harbor – took place over seven hours

The attack on Pearl Harbor was intended to neutralize the U.S. Pacific Fleet, and hence protect Japan’s advance into Malaya and the Dutch East Indies, where it sought access to natural resources such as oil and rubber.

American casualties and damages

Ninety minutes after it began, the attack was over. 2,008 sailors were killed and 710 others wounded; 218 soldiers and airmen (who were part of the Army until the independent U.S. Air Force was formed in 1947) were killed and 364 wounded; 109 marines were killed and 69 wounded; and 68 civilians were killed and 35 wounded. In total, 2,403 Americans died and 1,178 were wounded.[90] Eighteen ships were sunk or run aground, including five battleships. Of the American fatalities, nearly half were due to the explosion of Arizonas forward magazine after it was hit by a modified 40 cm (16 in.) shell.

Objectives

The attack had several major aims. First, it intended to destroy important American fleet units, thereby preventing the Pacific Fleet from interfering with Japanese conquest of the Dutch East Indies and Malaya. Second, it was hoped to buy time for Japan to consolidate its position and increase its naval strength before shipbuilding authorized by the 1940 Vinson-Walsh Act erased any chance of victory.[53][54] Finally, it was meant to deliver a severe blow to American morale, one which would discourage Americans from committing to a war extending into the western Pacific Ocean and Dutch East Indies. To maximize the effect on morale, battleships were chosen as the main targets, since they were the prestige ships of any navy at the time. The overall intention was to enable Japan to conquer Southeast Asia without interference.[53]

Striking the Pacific Fleet at anchor in Pearl Harbor carried two distinct disadvantages: the targeted ships would be in very shallow water, so it would be relatively easy to salvage and possibly repair them; and most of the crews would survive the attack, since many would be on shore leave or would be rescued from the harbor. A further important disadvantage—this of timing, and known to the Japanese—was the absence from Pearl Harbor of all three of the U.S. Pacific Fleet’s aircraft carriers (Enterprise, Lexington, and Saratoga). IJN top command was so imbued with Admiral Mahan‘s “decisive battle” doctrine—especially that of destroying the maximum number of battleships—that, despite these concerns, Yamamoto decided to press ahead.[55][page needed]

Japanese confidence in their ability to achieve a short, victorious war also meant other targets in the harbor, especially the navy yard, oil tank farms, and submarine base, were ignored, since—by their thinking—the war would be over before the influence of these facilities would be felt.

Salvage

Captain Homer N. Wallin (center) supervises salvage operations aboard USS California, early 1942

After a systematic search for survivors, formal salvage operations began. Captain Homer N. Wallin, Material Officer for Commander, Battle Force, U.S. Pacific Fleet, was immediately ordered to lead salvage operations. “Within a short time I was relieved of all other duties and ordered to full time work as Fleet Salvage Officer”.[112][nb 21]

Around Pearl Harbor, divers from the Navy (shore and tenders), the Naval Shipyard, and civilian contractors (Pacific Bridge and others) began work on the ships that could be refloated. They patched holes, cleared debris, and pumped water out of ships. Navy divers worked inside the damaged ships.

Within six months, five battleships and two cruisers were patched or re-floated so they could be sent to shipyards in Pearl Harbor and on the mainland for extensive repair.

Intensive salvage operations continued for another year, a total of some 20,000 man-hours under water.[114] Oklahoma, while successfully raised, was never repaired, and capsized while under tow to the mainland in 1947. Arizona and the target ship Utah were too heavily damaged for salvage, though much of their armament and equipment was removed and put to use aboard other vessels. Today, the two hulks remain where they were sunk,[115] with Arizona becoming a war memorial.

My Comment

The american worker are the ones that made this country great.  They crossed the plaines,  started farms, built cars etc.  and after Pearl Harbor got the US Navy back in business.  Today that is sometimes forgotten and too much credit to wall street!

The South-East Asian

Theatre of World War II was the name given to the campaigns of the Pacific War in Burma, Ceylon, India, Thailand, Indochina, Malaya and Singapore. Purposes of the conquest of these countries included the securing of natural resources such as rubber and petroleum from the European colonies in the region. Conflict in the theatre began when the Empire of Japan invaded French Indochina in September 1940, the war went to a new level with the Raid on Pearl Harbor, and simultaneous attacks on Hong Kong, the Philippines, Thailand, Singapore and Malaya on 7/8 December 1941. The main landing at Singora (now Songkhla) on the east side of the Isthmus of Kra preceded the bombing of Pearl Harbor by several hours. Action in the theatre officially ended on 9 September 1945.

Mass killings

source wikipedia 

Japanese soldiers shooting blindfolded Sikh prisoners. The photograph was found among Japanese records when British troops entered Singapore.

R. J. Rummel, a professor of political science at the University of Hawaii, estimates that between 1937 and 1945, the Japanese military murdered from nearly 3 to over 10 million people, most likely 6 million Chinese, Taiwanese, Singaporeans, Malaysians, Indonesians, Koreans, Filipinos and Indochinese, among others, including Western prisoners of war. According to Rummel, “This democide [i.e., death by government] was due to a morally bankrupt political and military strategy, military expediency and custom, and national culture.”[59] According to Rummel, in China alone, during 1937–45, approximately 3.9 million Chinese were killed, mostly civilians, as a direct result of the Japanese operations and 10.2 million in the course of the war.[60] The most infamous incident during this period was the Nanking Massacre of 1937–38, when, according to the findings of the International Military Tribunal for the Far East, the Japanese Army massacred as many as 300,000 civilians and prisoners of war, although the accepted figure is somewhere in the hundreds of thousands.

In Southeast Asia, the Manila massacre of February 1945 resulted in the death of 100,000 civilians in the Philippines. It is estimated that at least one out of every 20 Filipinos died at the hands of the Japanese during the occupation.[63][64] In Singapore during February and March 1942, the Sook Ching massacre was a systematic extermination of perceived hostile elements among the Chinese population there. Lee Kuan Yew, the ex-Prime Minister of Singapore, said during an interview with National Geographic that there were between 50,000 and 90,000 casualties,[65] while according to Major General Kawamura Saburo, there were 5,000 casualties in total.[66]

There were other massacres of civilians, e.g. the Kalagong massacre. In wartime Southeast Asia, the Overseas Chinese and European diaspora were special targets of Japanese abuse; in the former case, motivated by an inferiority complex vis-à-vis the historic expanse and influence of Chinese culture that did not exist with the Southeast Asian indigenes, and the latter, motivated by a racist Pan-Asianism and a desire to show former colonial subjects the impotence of their Western masters.[67] The Japanese executed all the Malay Sultans on Kalimantan and wiped out the Malay elite in the Pontianak incidents. In the Jesselton Revolt, the Japanese slaughtered thousands of native civilians during the Japanese occupation of British Borneo and nearly wiped out the entire Suluk Muslim population of the coastal islands. During the Japanese occupation of the Philippines, when a Moro Muslim juramentado swordsman launched a suicide attack against the Japanese, the Japanese would massacre the man’s entire family or village.

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 I hope I made you want to learn more about WWII    I gave the links to the resources

 

“Refugees are Human Beings” from an American that lives in SE ASIA

WE do not usual write about politics and try to just share the beauty of SE Asia with information to help you enjoy your stay here.

There are 4 reasons a country or people may object to helping.  FEAR IGNORANCE HATE or ECONOMICS

refugee

I am an American, Christian and live in SE Asia for a number of years.  I worked in Iraq as an american contractor so have seen what war does to families.  First refugees is a moral issue for me so that is the main factor shaping my view.  My grandfather was also an immigrant from Bohemia that came to America in the late 1890s to have a better life, so my family heritage.   I write this because have seen a number of americans some politicians, friends, and family that are against the US accepting Syrian refugees. This saddens me and is embarrassing but most of all disgusting!  Number of “want to be President of America” using fear and ignorance as a means to get votes! Not inspiring  americans but bringing out the worst in mankind.   Also, the Syrian refugees are not the only refugees, as in SE Asia the Rohingya Refugees is also a crisis!  The number of refugees around the world is a huge number “The latest figures available show that the number of refugees of concern to UNHCR in mid-2014 stood at 13 million refugees, up from a year earlier” UNHCR  “The refugees of concern to UNHCR are spread around the world, with half in Asia and some 28 per cent in Africa. They live in widely varying conditions, from well-established camps and collective centres to makeshift shelters or living in the open.” WikipediaAt the end of 2014, there were 19.5 million refugees worldwide 14.4 million under UNHCR‘s mandate, plus 5.1 million Palestinian refugees under UNRWA‘s mandate)”

Photos from Google Photos

Syrian Refugees

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Rohingya Refugees

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Refugee and immigration or fleeing religious persecution, economic hardship is not new.  America was founded by people fleeing Europe from religious intolerance  and poverty. 

Flowing Across Borders

text from UNHCR

The practice of granting asylum to people fleeing persecution in foreign lands is one of the earliest hallmarks of civilization. References to it have been found in texts written 3,500 years ago, during the blossoming of the great early empires in the Middle East such as the Hittites, Babylonians, Assyrians and ancient Egyptians.

Global migration patterns have become increasingly complex in modern times, involving not just refugees, but also millions of economic migrants. But refugees and migrants, even if they often travel in the same way, are fundamentally different, and for that reason are treated very differently under modern international law.

Migrants, especially economic migrants, choose to move in order to improve the future prospects of themselves and their families. Refugees have to move if they are to save their lives or preserve their freedom. They have no protection from their own state – indeed it is often their own government that is threatening to persecute them. If other countries do not let them in, and do not help them once they are in, then they may be condemning them to death – or to an intolerable life in the shadows, without sustenance and without rights.

 

An Introduction to Statelessness

text from UNHCR

People are often asked, at some point in their lives, what nationality they have. However, not many question how and why they have acquired their nationality. Is nationality something we are born with? Is it something we acquire? Can we lose it? The answer to these questions is yes. However, unless you have encountered problems with your nationality, you probably take it for granted.

Having a nationality is something so natural that people rarely stop to think about what life would be like without it. But at least 10 million people worldwide have no nationality. That is the same as the combined populations of Norway and Denmark. Moreover, most of these 10 million people are stateless by no fault of their own. Statelessness – not having a nationality – occurs because of discrimination against certain groups; redrawing of borders; and gaps in nationality laws.

The constant in all of this is that someone without a nationality cannot live the same life as someone with a nationality:

  • Try to get an ID card if you have no nationality;
  • Try opening a bank account without an ID card;
  • Try to board a flight without a passport;
  • Try to enrol in university without proof of nationality.

These things are impossible for stateless people to do in a way that is safe and dignified. So imagine a lifetime of obstacles and disappointment and imagine 10 million people who cannot achieve their full potential.

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maverickbird

#maldives #maldivestourism #maldivesonabudgetI had incurred some unnecessary expenses due to my foolish decisions and confusions as a first timer in Maldives. Add to that laidback islander attitude of Maldivians and you will understand why the archipelago burns holes in traveler’s pockets. Maldivians are notorious for not answering their phones and it is useless to call them post dinner. They sometimes don’t respond to emails on time and on my 2nd day in Male, I had a panic situation on my hands. There had been just a few hours left before my transfer.to Alif Dhaalu, the airport island of my Maldivian home stay in Fenfushi and I had been eagerly waiting to get out of Male. However, in the last moment, I had received an email from Fenfushi Inn stating that they would not be able to offer the requested speedboat transfer and wanted to confirm if I had still wanted to stay with…

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Peter's Big Adventure

I’m going to kick this off with a pet peeve of mine. When people talk about places they visit, I’ve almost never heard a bad review. Ever. About anywhere. It’s weird, but it’s kind of politically incorrect to say that a place sucks. But even beyond that, it’s also a downer, which nobody wants to hear. When people ask “how are you?” I have found that they rarely actually want to know. It’s just a greeting. But let’s be real here: sometimes I’m not doing so well. And not every place I visit is amazing.

Varanasi is a place that should have been amazing. It was beautiful, it was interesting, it was a place unlike anything I’ve ever seen before. But when I think back on it, I don’t think about that. I think about the endless conga line of assholes that tried to rip me off so shamelessly. I’ll…

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She Walks the World

Being a fan of South Korean music, movies and dramas; I’ve always imagined Jeju Island to be sort of a magical place. It is constantly described as an elusive spot for a romantic vacation or a place to runaway from the realities of life. With its stunning beaches, lovely countryside, beautiful scenery and luxurious seaside resorts– the island is exactly as how it is depicted. It is the most popular honeymoon destination for Korean newlyweds and attracts drove of tourists all throughout the year.

Mynn's Top 10 Things to do in Jeju Island - www.shewalkstheworld.com

Jeju Island is South Korea’s largest island, located off the Southern coast of the Korean peninsular, on the Korea Strait. The island is South Korea’s only Special Autonomous Province, becoming a province of its own in 1946. Several areas on Jeju Island are designated UNESCO World Heritage sites.

I had the opportunity to visit the island in Spring– a great time to witness the lushness of…

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