LIFE SE ASIA MAGAZINE

Current Malaria Treatment Fails in Cambodia Due to Drug-Resistant Parasites New Findings Inform New WHO Treatment Guidelines that Reinstate Former First-Line Therapy ​WHAT: New findings from the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID), part of the National Institutes of Health (NIH), confirm dihydroartemisinin-piperaquine, the first-line treatment for Plasmodium falciparum malaria infection in Cambodia, has failed in certain provinces due to parasite resistance to artemisinin and piperaquine. Dihydroartemisinin-piperaquine is an artemisinin combination therapy (ACT) for malaria that combines potent, fast-acting artemisinin with a long-acting partner drug, piperaquine. Resistance to artemisinin in parts of Southeast Asia is well-documented, but until now only a few studies have presented clear evidence of piperaquine resistance. Additional study findings suggest that artesunate, a form of artemisinin, plus mefloquine, a different long-acting partner drug, should be the first-line ACT in areas where dihydroartemisinin-piperaquine treatment has failed, the study authors note. NIAID researchers and colleagues sought to confirm the presence of piperaquine-resistant infections in Cambodia by comparing the efficacy of dihydroartemisinin-piperaquine treatment in 204 malaria-afflicted participants aged 2 to 65 years from three provinces in Cambodia with varying levels of artemisinin resistance. After monitoring parasite levels in the blood for 63 days, investigators found parasites had reemerged despite initial clearance in 45.7 percent of participants in Pursat, 15.9 percent of participants in Preah Vihear and 1.67 percent of participants in Ratanakiri. The results indicate the ACT is failing in Pursat and Preah Vihear, where artemisinin resistance is common, but remains highly efficacious in Ratanakiri, where resistance is uncommon. Laboratory tests showed the parasites from dihydroartemisinin-piperaquine failures contained a genetic marker of artemisinin resistance and had a decreased susceptibility to piperaquine, demonstrating that both artemisinin and piperaquine resistance contributed to treatment failures. However, the parasites also showed an increased susceptibility to mefloquine and completely lacked the molecular marker for mefloquine resistance. These findings informed new WHO guidelines reinstating artesunate plus mefloquine as the first-line ACT in Cambodia where dihydroartemisinin-piperaquine treatment has failed. The findings also provide evidence to initiate surveillance programs to track the spread of piperaquine resistance and clinical trials to test alternative combination therapies.

Source: Media Availability: Current Malaria Treatment Fails in Cambodia Due to Drug-Resistant Parasites

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Stafford on Tour

Our plan had us heading straight to Ban Lung, but instead we decided to head east into the Mondulkiri (lots of beautiful jungle cloaked mountains and plantations, but little else). In Sen Monorom (the regional capital) we scored a cute little bungalow at the Happy Elephant for super cheap – no frills but all the thrills – and headed straight for a waterfall to enjoy the rest of the day. We had heard bizarrely good reports of a pizza restaurant (Mondulkiri Pizza) in the town, so thought we would have a look and after about half and hour of wandering the back streets, in the pitch black being barked at by every single dog, we managed to find it and had an admittedly great pizza while watching the Cambodia v Japan football.

En route to the falls on a moto

Next up, a very exciting day. We were headed into…

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Bon Om Touk (Khmer: បុណ្យអុំទូក, IPA: [bon om tuːk]), or the Cambodian Water Festival,

is a Cambodian festival celebrated in November and marks a reversal of the flow of the Tonle Sap River. Every town and province joins in with the festival but the biggest celebrations take place in Phnom Penh with boat racing along the Sisowath Quay. For three days, workers from every province join with the city’s residents to celebrate by night and day. The festival lasts for three days, and commemorates the end of the country’s rainy season,[1] as well as the reversal of flow of the Tonle Sap River.[2] It includes boat races and concerts, and attracts several million people each year.  source is From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

More than 400 boats, propelled by precision-trained oarsmen, take part in the annual boat race, the highlight of the Water Festival or Bon Om Touk. This is one of the major events in the Kingdom which attracts multitudes of people from the various provinces to the capital Phnom Penh.

Bon Om Touk

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maverickbird

#cambodianfood #khmerfood

I am an aspiring domestic goddess and my culinary skills can be best regarded as utilitarian. My ambitious projects turn out to be disasters of catastrophic proportions and my hastily rustled meals are the real stars. It had not always been like this and there had been a time when I had found cooking to be seriously soothing.

#cambodianfood #khmerfood Exotic ingredients of Khmer cuisine

However, with changing roles, times and life demands, work had taken priority and my profession had not nurtured my dream of being a good, creative cook. But, till today, I love the colours, sights and smells of a fresh wet market and aroma of food is simply orgiastic for me. The last few years have been professionally very hectic for me and time and continents have raced at breakneck speed. 2015 have been kinder and thus once again, I have time to indulge in my favourite activities.

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