LIFE SE ASIA MAGAZINE

Security Alert Vietnam

Security Alert-U.S. Embassy Hanoi

U.S. Consulate Ho Chi Minh City

Location: Throughout VietnamThroughout Vietnam

Event: The U.S. Mission to Vietnam advises U.S. citizens of the High Crime rating for Vietnam. Recent reports of criminal activities include unwanted sexual advances, targeting children in public places for potential kidnapping, and reports of wrongdoing by taxis and ride-sharing services, including sexual harassment and theft of personal items. Recent reports of criminal activities include unwanted sexual advances, targeting children in public places for potential kidnapping, and reports of wrongdoing by taxis and ride-sharing services, including sexual harassment and theft of personal items.







Language:

Select 

What is the current situation?

Travelers have returned from certain areas of Southeast Asia with Zika virus infection. While our understanding of the complications of Zika virus infection continues to evolve, and pending broader international surveillance efforts for Zika virus infection, we are providing pregnant women and their partners updated recommendations on reducing their risk for travel related Zika virus infection. CDC recommends pregnant women should consider postponing nonessential travel to Southeast Asia countries with reports of Zika virus infection from local transmission or related to travel to those countries, and those countries with adjacent borders where limited information is available to fully evaluate risk of Zika virus infection. 

Travel Considerations for Pregnant Women Traveling to Southeast Asia

Zika virus infection during pregnancy causes severe birth defects, including microcephaly and severe fetal brain abnormalities. Therefore, pregnant women should talk with their healthcare provider and consider postponing nonessential travel to Southeast Asia. Zika virus testing should be offered to pregnant women and considered for other people who have symptoms of Zika virus disease if they have recently traveled to Southeast Asia.

Zika virus has been present in areas of Southeast Asia for many years, and several countries have reported occasional cases or small outbreaks of Zika virus infections. Zika virus is considered endemic in some countries, and a large number of local residents are likely to be immune. However, US travelers to endemic areas may not be immune to Zika virus and infections have occurred among travelers to Southeast Asia. Recent variations have been observed in the number of cases reported in Southeast Asia. This can reflect changes in awareness of Zika virus, surveillance and testing for Zika virus, or changes in intensity of Zika virus transmission. Pregnant women traveling to Southeast Asia could become infected with Zika virus. The level of this risk is unknown and likely lower than in areas where Zika virus is newly introduced and spreading widely.

Countries included in this travel message include those listed below. For country-specific information, please visit Health Information for Travelers for individual countries:

What can travelers do to prevent Zika?

There is no vaccine or medicine for Zika virus infection. Travelers can protect themselves by preventing mosquito bites:

  • Cover exposed skin by wearing long-sleeved shirts and long pants.
  • Use EPA-registered insect repellents containing DEET, picaridin, oil of lemon eucalyptus (OLE, also called para-menthane-diol [PMD]), or IR3535. Always use as directed.
    • Pregnant and breastfeeding women can use all EPA-registered insect repellents, including DEET, according to the product label.
    • Most repellents, including DEET, can be used on children older than 2 months. (OLE should not be used on children younger than 3 years.)
  • Use permethrin-treated clothing and gear (such as boots, pants, socks, and tents). You can buy pre-treated clothing and gear or treat them yourself.
  • Stay in places with air conditioning and window and door screens to keep mosquitoes outside.
  • Sleep under a mosquito bed net if air conditioned or screened rooms are not available or if sleeping outdoors.
  • Mosquito netting can be used to cover babies younger than 2 months old in carriers, strollers, or cribs to protect them from mosquito bites.

Zika virus can be passed through sex from a person who has Zika virus to his or her sex partners. The use of condoms during sex (vaginal, anal, and oral) or abstaining from sex while traveling to these areas and after returning from these areas is recommended to avoid getting or passing Zika virus infection.

After travel:

Many people infected with Zika virus do not feel sick. If a mosquito bites an infected person while the virus is still in that person’s blood, it can spread the virus by biting another person. Even if they do not feel sick, travelers returning to the United States from countries where Zika virus is endemic should take steps to prevent mosquito bites for 3 weeks so that they do not spread Zika virus to uninfected mosquitoes.

Travelers returning from countries where Zika virus is endemic and who have a pregnant partner should either use condoms or not have sex for the rest of the pregnancy.

For more information, see Zika and Sexual Transmission.

If you feel sick and think you may have Zika virus:

  • Talk to your doctor if you develop a fever with a rash, joint pain, or red eyes. Tell him or her about your travel.
  • Take acetaminophen (paracetamol) to relieve fever and pain. Do not take aspirin, products containing aspirin, or other nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, such as ibuprofen.
  • Get lots of rest and drink plenty of liquids.

If you are pregnant:

Talk to a doctor or other healthcare provider after your trip, even if you don’t feel sick. Pregnant women who have symptoms and have traveled to these countries should be offered testing for Zika virus infection. Pregnant women who have symptoms and who have had a possible sexual exposure during pregnancy to a partner who traveled to these countries should be offered testing for Zika virus infection.

  • If you develop a fever with a rash, joint pain, or red eyes, talk to your doctor immediately and tell him or her about your travel or possible sexual exposure.

Clinician Information

Zika virus during pregnancy causes severe birth defects, including microcephaly and severe fetal brain abnormalities. All pregnant women should be evaluated for possible Zika virus exposure and signs or symptoms consistent with Zika virus disease at each prenatal care visit.

Possible exposures include

  • Travel to an area where there is epidemic or endemic Zika virus transmission
  • Sex with a partner who has traveled to or lived in an area with epidemic or endemic Zika virus transmission

The recommendations for testing vary according to whether exposure occurred in an area where Zika virus has been newly introduced and is spreading widely or in an area with endemic Zika virus transmission. Dengue and Japanese encephalitis viruses circulate widely in Southeast Asia and might cause false positive results in blood tests. Because of this and related testing factors, routine serologic testing of asymptomatic pregnant women who have traveled to areas of Southeast Asia without epidemic Zika virus transmission is not recommended. For more information, please visit the Clinical Guidance for Healthcare Providers Caring for Pregnant Womenwebpage.

Clinical Guidance for Healthcare Providers Caring for Infants & Children is also available.

Additional Resources

For Travelers:

For Clinicians:

National Center for Emerging and Zoonotic Infectious Diseases (NCEZID)

Division of Global Migration and Quarantine (DGMQ)

TOP

Situation update
29 September 2015 — Countries in the Western Pacific Region and the South-East Asia Region continue to report new Zika cases. The South-East Asia Region has also reported cases of microcephaly that are currently under investigation to determine if they may be linked to Zika infection.

Clink link below for interactive map of where

http://www.who.int/emergencies/zika-virus/situation-report/Zika-timeline-22-sept.png?ua=1

Key updates

  • Countries and territories reporting mosquito-borne Zika virus infections for the first time in the past week:
  • None
  • Mosquito-borne Zika infections acquired by travelers returning from the Maldives were reported by Germany and Spain in the past week. Prior Zika cases were reported in January 2016.
  • Countries in the Western Pacific Region continue to report new cases as seen in Singapore, Philippines, Malaysia and Viet Nam. Thailand, in the South-East Asia Region, has also recently reported Zika cases. Key areas of the response as identified by members of the Association of Southeast Asian Nations (ASEAN) are disease surveillance and risk assessment, relevant and timely sharing of data, regional surveillance and response, vector control, diagnostic testing, laboratory networks and risk communication, and sharing knowledge and best practices. The Ministry of Public Health of Thailand is investigating cases of microcephaly to determine if they may be linked to Zika infection.
  • Current Malaria Treatment Fails in Cambodia Due to Drug-Resistant Parasites New Findings Inform New WHO Treatment Guidelines that Reinstate Former First-Line Therapy ​WHAT: New findings from the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID), part of the National Institutes of Health (NIH), confirm dihydroartemisinin-piperaquine, the first-line treatment for Plasmodium falciparum malaria infection in Cambodia, has failed in certain provinces due to parasite resistance to artemisinin and piperaquine. Dihydroartemisinin-piperaquine is an artemisinin combination therapy (ACT) for malaria that combines potent, fast-acting artemisinin with a long-acting partner drug, piperaquine. Resistance to artemisinin in parts of Southeast Asia is well-documented, but until now only a few studies have presented clear evidence of piperaquine resistance. Additional study findings suggest that artesunate, a form of artemisinin, plus mefloquine, a different long-acting partner drug, should be the first-line ACT in areas where dihydroartemisinin-piperaquine treatment has failed, the study authors note. NIAID researchers and colleagues sought to confirm the presence of piperaquine-resistant infections in Cambodia by comparing the efficacy of dihydroartemisinin-piperaquine treatment in 204 malaria-afflicted participants aged 2 to 65 years from three provinces in Cambodia with varying levels of artemisinin resistance. After monitoring parasite levels in the blood for 63 days, investigators found parasites had reemerged despite initial clearance in 45.7 percent of participants in Pursat, 15.9 percent of participants in Preah Vihear and 1.67 percent of participants in Ratanakiri. The results indicate the ACT is failing in Pursat and Preah Vihear, where artemisinin resistance is common, but remains highly efficacious in Ratanakiri, where resistance is uncommon. Laboratory tests showed the parasites from dihydroartemisinin-piperaquine failures contained a genetic marker of artemisinin resistance and had a decreased susceptibility to piperaquine, demonstrating that both artemisinin and piperaquine resistance contributed to treatment failures. However, the parasites also showed an increased susceptibility to mefloquine and completely lacked the molecular marker for mefloquine resistance. These findings informed new WHO guidelines reinstating artesunate plus mefloquine as the first-line ACT in Cambodia where dihydroartemisinin-piperaquine treatment has failed. The findings also provide evidence to initiate surveillance programs to track the spread of piperaquine resistance and clinical trials to test alternative combination therapies.

    Source: Media Availability: Current Malaria Treatment Fails in Cambodia Due to Drug-Resistant Parasites

    To learn more about Malaria go here

     

    Travel insurance: simple & flexible

    You can buy, extend and claim online, even after you’ve left home. Travel insurance from WorldNomads.com is available to people from over 140 countries. It’s designed for adventurous travellers with cover for overseas medical, evacuation, baggage and a range of adventure sports and activities.

    Polio in Myanmar CDC Alert – Level 2, Practice Enhanced Precautions 12/21/2015

    Screen Shot 2015-12-23 at 8.59.16 AM

    source Centers for Disease Control and Prevention  a USA Agency  Dated December 21 2015

    What is the current situation?

    Myanmar has reported 2 cases of vaccine-derived polio, which can develop and circulate in areas with low vaccination coverage where oral polio vaccine (OPV) is used. CDC recommends that all travelers to Myanmar be fully vaccinated against polio. In addition, adults who have been fully vaccinated should receive a single lifetime booster dose of polio vaccine. (Inactivated polio vaccine [IPV] is used in the United States instead of OPV. IPV does not contain live virus, so it cannot cause vaccine-derived polio.)

    What is polio?

    Polio is a disease caused by a virus that affects the nervous system and is mainly spread by person-to-person contact. Polio can also be spread by drinking water or other drinks or eating raw or undercooked food that are contaminated with the feces of an infected person.

    Most people with polio do not feel sick. Some people have only minor symptoms, such as fever, tiredness, nausea, headache, nasal congestion, sore throat, cough, stiffness in the neck and back, and pain in the arms and legs. Most people recover completely. In rare cases, polio infection causes permanent loss of muscle function in the arms or legs (usually the legs); if there is loss of function of the muscles used for breathing or infection of the brain, death can occur.

     

    What can travelers do to prevent polio?

    • Get the polio vaccine:
      • Ask your doctor or nurse to find out if you are up-to-date with your polio vaccination and whether you need a booster dose before traveling. Even if you were vaccinated as a child or have been sick with polio before, you may need a booster dose to make sure that you are protected. See individual destination pages(/travel/destinations/list) for vaccine recommendation information.
      • Make sure children are vaccinated.
      • See Vaccine Information Statements (VIS) for more information.
    • Eat safe foods and drink safe beverages: Follow the Food and Water Safety(/travel/page/food-water-safety) tips to avoid eating or drinking things that could be contaminated with polio.
    • Practice hygiene and cleanliness:
      • Wash your hands often.
      • If soap and water aren’t available, clean hands with hand sanitizer (containing at least 60% alcohol).
      • Don’t touch your eyes, nose, or mouth. If you need to touch your face, make sure your hands are clean.
      • Cover your mouth and nose with a tissue or your sleeve (not your hands) when coughing or sneezing.
      • Try to avoid close contact, such as kissing, hugging, or sharing eating utensils or cups with people who are sick.

    Traveler Information

     

    Dengue In Malaysia Watch CDC

    What is the current situation?

    According to the World Health Organization, from October 18-24, 2015, there were 2,286 cases of dengue reported in Malaysia.

    Travelers to Malaysia should protect themselves against mosquito bites to avoid getting dengue.

    What can travelers do to prevent dengue?

    Learn more about dengue.

    No vaccine or medicine can prevent dengue. Travelers can protect themselves by preventing mosquito bites.

    Prevent mosquito bites:

    • Cover exposed skin by wearing long-sleeved shirts, long pants, and hats.
    • Use an insect repellent as directed.
    • Higher percentages of active ingredient provide longer protection. Use products with the following active ingredients:
      • DEET (products containing DEET include Off!, Cutter, Sawyer, and Ultrathon)
      • Picaridin (also known as KBR 3023, Bayrepel, and icaridin; products containing picaridin include Cutter Advanced, Skin So Soft Bug Guard Plus, and Autan [outside the United States])
      • Oil of lemon eucalyptus (OLE) or PMD (products containing OLE include Repel and Off! Botanicals)
      • IR3535 (products containing IR3535 include Skin So Soft Bug Guard Plus Expedition and SkinSmart)
    • Always follow product directions and reapply as directed:
    • If you are also using sunscreen, apply sunscreen first and insect repellent second.
    • Follow package directions when applying repellent on children. Avoid applying repellent to their hands, eyes, and mouth.
    • Treated clothing remains protective after multiple washings. See the product information to find out how long the protection will last.
    • If treating items yourself, follow the product instructions carefully.
    • Do not use permethrin directly on skin.
    • Use permethrin-treated clothing and gear (such as boots, pants, socks, and tents). You can buy pretreated clothing and gear or treat them yourself:
    • Stay and sleep in screened or air conditioned rooms.
    • Use a bed net if the area where you are sleeping is exposed to the outdoors.

    If you feel sick and think you may have dengue:

    • Talk to your doctor or nurse if you feel seriously ill, especially if you have a fever.

    Traveler Information

    Can read more about Dengue on our website here

    Travel insurance: simple & flexible

    You can buy, extend and claim online, even after you’ve left home. Travel insurance from WorldNomads.com is available to people from over 140 countries. It’s designed for adventurous travellers with cover for overseas medical, evacuation, baggage and a range of adventure sports and activities.

    %d bloggers like this: