Train Travel Philippines

Philippines National Railways

The Manila Metro Rail Transit System, also known as the MRT Line 3, MRT-3, or Metrostar Express, is a rapid transit system of Metro Manila, Philippines and is composed of a single line that runs in the general direction along the north and south lanes of Epifanio de los Santos Avenue (EDSA). Although it has the characteristics of light rail, such as the type of rolling stock used, it is more akin to a rapid transit system owing to its total grade separation and high passenger throughput. Envisioned in the 1970s as part of the Metropolitan Manila Strategic Mass Rail Transit Development Plan, the thirteen-station, 16.9-kilometer (10.5 mi) line was the second rapid transit line to be built in Metro Manila when it started operations in 1999. It is currently operated by the Metro Rail Transit Corporation (MRTC), a private company operating in partnership with theDepartment of Transportation and Communications (DOTC) under a Build-Operate-Transfer agreement.

Serving close to 600,000 passengers on a daily basis, MRT-3 is the busiest among Metro Manila’s three rapid transit lines, built with essential standards such as barrier-free access and the use of magnetic card tickets to better facilitate passenger access. However, total ridership significantly exceeds the its built maximum capacity, with various solutions being proposed or implemented to alleviate chronic congestion in addition to the procurement of new rolling stock. However, these solutions have had a mixed effect on ridership, and experts have questioned the line’s structural integrity owing to overcrowding on board the line despite pronouncements that the system in general is safe.

MRT-3 is integrated with the public transit system in Metro Manila, and passengers also take various forms of road-based public transport, such as buses, to and from a station to reach their intended destination. Although the line aimed to reduce traffic congestion and travel times along EDSA, the transportation system has only been partially successful due to the rising number of motor vehicles and rapid urbanization. Expanding the network’s capacity to accommodate the rising number of passengers is set on tackling this problem.

MRT 3

The line serves 13 stations on 16.9 kilometers (10.5 mi) of line, spaced on average around 1,300 metres (4,300 ft) apart.[4] The rails are mostly elevated and erected either over or along the roads covered, with sections below ground before and after Buendia and Ayala stations, the only underground stations on the line. The southern terminus of the line is the Taft Avenue station at the intersection between Epifanio de los Santos Avenue and Taft Avenue, while the northern terminus is the North Avenue station along Epifanio de los Santos Avenue in Barangay Bagong Pag-asa, Quezon City. The rail line serves the cities thatCircumferential Road 4 (Epifanio de los Santos Avenue) passes through: Pasay, Makati, Mandaluyong, San Juan and Quezon City.

Three stations currently serve as interchanges between the lines operated by the MRTC, LRTA and PNR. Magallanes Station is nearby to EDSA Station on the PNR, Araneta Center-Cubao is connected by a covered walkway to its namesake station of the LRT-2; and Taft Avenue Station is connected via covered walkway to the EDSA Station of the LRT-1.

The MRT-3 is open from 5:30 a.m. PST (UTC+8) until 11:00 p.m on weekdays, and 5:30 a.m. PST (UTC+8) until 10:00 pm during weekends and holidays. It operates almost every day of the year unless otherwise announced. Special schedules are announced via the PA system in every station and also in newspapers and other mass media. During Holy Week, a public holiday in the Philippines, the rail system is closed for annual maintenance, owing to fewer commuters and traffic around the metro. Normal operation resumes on Easter Sunday.

The MRT-3 has experimented with extended opening hours in the last few years, the first of which included 24-hour operations beginning on June 1, 2009 (primarily aimed at serving call center agents and other workers in the business process outsourcing sector).[6] Citing low ridership figures and financial losses, this was suspended after two days, and operations were instead extended from 5:00 a.m. to 1:00 a.m.[7] MRT-3 operations subsequently returned to the former schedule by April 2010, but services were again extended starting March 10, 2014, with trains running on a trial basis from 4:30 am to 11:30 pm in anticipation of major traffic buildup in light of several major road projects beginning in 2014.

Station layout and accessibility

MRT-3 stations have a standard layout, with a concourse level and a platform level. The concourse is usually above the platform, with stairs, escalators and elevators leading down to the platform level. Station concourses contain ticket booths, which is separated from the platform level by fare gates.[4] Some stations, such as Araneta Center-Cubao, are connected at concourse level to nearby buildings, such as shopping malls, for easier accessibility. Most stations are also barrier-free inside and outside the station, and trains have spaces for passengers using wheelchairs.[4]

Stations either have island platforms, such as Taft Avenue and Shaw Boulevard, or side platforms, such as Ortigas and North Avenue. Part of the platform corresponding to the front car of the train is cordoned off for the use of women, children, elderly and disabled passengers.

MRT-3 stations are also designed to occupy the entire span of EDSA, allowing passengers to safely cross between one end of the road and the other.[4]

Shops and services

Inside the concourse of all stations is at least one stall or stand where people can buy food or drinks. Stalls vary by station, and some have fast food stalls. The number of stalls also varies by station, and stations tend to have a wide variety, especially in stations such as Ayala and Shaw Boulevard.

Stations such as Taft Avenue and North Avenue are connected to or are near shopping malls and/or other large shopping areas, where commuters are offered more shopping varieties

Fares Ticketing

The MRT-3, like the LRT-1 and LRT-2, uses a distance-based fare structure, with fares ranging from ten to fifteen pesos (23 to 35 U.S. cents), depending on the destination. Commuters who ride the MRT-3 are charged ₱10 for the first three stations, ₱11 for 4–5 stations, ₱12 for 6–8 stations, ₱14 for 9–11 stations and ₱15 for 12 stations or the entire line. Children below 1.02 metres (3 ft 4.4 in) (the height of a fare gate) may ride for free on the MRT-3.

Types of tickets

Two types of MRT-3 tickets exist: a single-journey (one-way) ticket whose cost is dependent on the destination, and a stored-value (multiple-use) ticket for 100 pesos. The 200-peso & 500-peso stored-value tickets was issued in the past, but has since been phased out. The single-journey ticket is valid only on the date of purchase. Meanwhile, the stored-value ticket is valid for three months from date of first use.[32]

MRT-3 tickets come in several incarnations: these include tickets bearing the portraits of former presidents Joseph Estrada and Gloria Macapagal-Arroyo,[35] which have since been phased out, and one bearing the logos of the DOTCand the MRTC. Ticket shortages are common: in 2005, the MRTC was forced to recycle tickets bearing Estrada’s portrait to address critical ticket shortages, even resorting to borrowing stored-value tickets from the LRTA,[36] and even cutting unusable tickets in half for use as manual passes.[37] Shortages were also reported in 2012,[38] and the DOTC was working on procuring additional tickets in 2014.[39] Because of the ticket shortages, it has become common practice for regular passengers to purchase several stored-value tickets at a time, though ticket shortages still persist.[40]

Although the MRT-3 has partnered with private telecommunications companies in experimenting with RFID technology as an alternative ticketing system in the past,[41][42] these were phased out in 2009.[43]

Fare adjustment

Adjusting passenger fares has been employed by the MRTC as a means to boost flagging ridership figures,[44] and the issue of MRT-3 fares both historically and in the present day continues to be a contentious political issue involving officials at even the highest levels of government.

Current MRT-3 fare levels were set on July 15, 2000 under the orders of then President Estrada; this was intended to have the MRT-3 become competitive against other modes of transport.[45] While originally set to last until January 2001,[45] the new fare structure persisted due to strong public opposition against increasing fares,[46] especially as MRT-3 ridership increased significantly after lower fares were implemented.[44] These lower fares—which are only slightly more expensive than jeepney fares—are financed through large government subsidies amounting to around ₱45 per passenger,[46][47] and which for both the MRT and LRT reached ₱75 billion between 2004 and 2014.

Passenger fare subsidies are unpopular outside Metro Manila, with subsidy opponents claiming that their taxes are being used to subsidize Metro Manila commuters without any benefit to the countryside, and that the fare subsidies should be used for infrastructure improvements in the rest of the country.[50] In the 2013 State of the Nation Address, President Benigno Aquino III claimed that it would be unfair for non-Metro Manila residents to use their taxes to subsidize the LRT and MRT.[51] However, supporters of the subsidies claim that the rest of the country benefits economically from efficient transportation in Metro Manila.

STATIONS

LOCATION

Tutuban Mayhaligue St., across Tutuban Centermall
Blumentritt Corner  Rizal Ave. near LRT Blummentritt Station
Dapitan/ Laon Laan In between Dapitan, Laong Laan, Algeciras and Antipolo Streets
Espana Between Antipolo and Algeciras Streets,  along España boulevard
Sta. Mesa Near Ramon Magsaysay Blvd, Sta Mesa, near PUP Main campus
Pandacan Along Padre Zamora ( formerly Tomas Claudio)  St. corner Beata, Pandacan
Paco Quirino Ave near Plaza Dilao
San Andres Located at the intersecton of Ariadores St., San Andres St.,  and Osmeña highway in San Andres, manila
Vito Cruz Corner of Pablo Ocampo Extension and Osmeña Highway, San Andres manila
Buendia Corner of Gil Puyat(Buendia) and Osmeña Highway
Pasay Road  In between  Estacion Street and Osmeña Highway in Makati, near Waltermart Makati.
Edsa Located at the intersection of South Luzon Expressway and EDSA bellow the Magallanes Interchange, Makati City
Nichols East Service Road of South Luzon Expressway in Taguig, in front of Nichol’s Interchange
FTI East Service Road of South Luzon Expressway in Taguig, near C-5 ramp
Bicutan General Santos Aveñue in Paranaque, near SM Bicutan
Sucat Along Meralco Road, Muntinlupa City
Alabang Along T. Molina Street in Alabang, Muntinlupa, back of Starmall
Muntinlupa Rizal Street, Brgy Poblacion, Muntinlupa City
San Pedro Brgy Nueva, San Pedro, Laguna
Biñan General Malvar Street, Brgy San Vicente, Biñan City, Laguna
Sta. Rosa Barangay Labas, City Proper Santa Rosa City, Laguna
Cabuyao Barangay Bigaa, Cabuyao, Laguna
Mamatid Barangay Mamatid, Cabuyao, Laguna
Calamba Purok 7 Barangay Uno PNR Calamba City

 

Station Kilometer Distance
STATIONS
CODE
KM Distance
TUTUBAN
TU
0.50
BLUMENTRITT
BLU
2.7
LAON-LAAN
LLN
3.82
ESPAÑA
SPÑ
4.5
STA. MESA
SA
6.5
PANDACAN
PD
7.98
PACO
PC
9.46
SAN ANDRES
SAN
10.42
VITO CRUZ
VTC
11.02
BUENDIA
DIA
12.28
PASAY ROAD
PRD
13.22
EDSA
EDS
14.3
NICHOLS
NIC
17.9
FOOD TERMINAL, INC.
FTI
18.6
BICUTAN
BIC
20.9
SUCAT
SU
25.02
ALABANG
AA
28.693
MUNTINLUPA
MP
32.013
SAN PEDRO, L.
SPL
35.374
PACITA MAIN GATE
PMG
37.55
GOLDEN CITY 1
GC1
38.72
BIÑAN
ÑA
39.764
STA. ROSA, L
SRL
43.806
CABUYAO
AO
47.42
MAMATID
TD
52.956
CALAMBA
LA
56.138

 

TRAIN SCHEDULE PER STATION

FARE MATRIX – METRO COMMUTER

Fare_Matrix

 

MRT 3

 

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