LIFE SE ASIA MAGAZINE

Rabies is a preventable viral disease of mammals most often transmitted through the bite of a rabid animal. The vast majority of rabies cases reported to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) each year occur in wild animals like raccoons, skunks, bats, and foxes.

rabies

we are not doctors but bring to you reliable information from sources and give you the link of the source.  Please refer to a medical professional if ill or have questions.

Source NCBI  US National Library of Medicine
National Institutes of Health

Rabies remains a problem in most countries of Southeast Asia, where stray dogs and cats are common. Financial, political, and cultural issues are the main barriers to public health authorities’ controlling the disease in animals.1 Local people and travelers in this area are inevitably at risk of exposure to the rabies virus if bitten or licked by an infected animal. Pre-exposure prophylaxis is an excellent preventive measure against rabies in travelers. However, it is expensive, and the cost-benefit relationship is not clear, so that it has limited application in general travel-medicine practice.

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This is a reference page as part of my Journey Parkinsonism Pugilistica my experience/journey by jackie

I am not a doctor or trained in the medical field or an expert. This is only my journey and if you think you have need medical advice suggest going to a doctor or medical facility!

Source is the Mayo Clinic

Definition

By Mayo Clinic Staff

Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (a-mi-o-TROE-fik LAT-ur-ul skluh-ROE-sis), or ALS, is a nervous system (neurological) disease that causes muscle weakness and impacts physical function.

ALS is often called Lou Gehrig’s disease, after the famous baseball player who was diagnosed with it. ALS is a type of motor neuron disease that causes nerve cells to gradually break down and die. In the United States, ALS is sometimes called motor neuron disease.

In most cases, doctors don’t know why ALS occurs. A small number of cases are inherited.

ALS often begins with muscle twitching and weakness in an arm or leg, or sometimes with slurring of speech. Eventually, ALS can affect your ability to control the muscles needed to move, speak, eat and breathe. ALS can’t be cured and eventually leads to death.

Early signs and symptoms of ALS include:

  • Difficulty walking, tripping or difficulty doing your normal daily activities
  • Weakness in your leg, feet or ankles
  • Hand weakness or clumsiness
  • Slurring of speech or trouble swallowing
  • Muscle cramps and twitching in your arms, shoulders and tongue
  • Difficulty holding your head up or keeping a good posture

The disease frequently begins in your hands, feet or limbs, and then spreads to other parts of your body. As the disease advances, your muscles become progressively weaker. This weakness eventually affects chewing, swallowing, speaking and breathing.

However, ALS doesn’t usually affect your bowel or bladder control, your senses, or your thinking ability. It’s possible to remain actively involved with your family and friends.

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This is a reference page about CTE that is included in my series of Parkinsonism Pugilistica my experience/journey

I am not a doctor or trained in the medical field or an expert. This is only my journey and if you think you have need medical advice suggest going to a doctor or medical facility!

The source for this article is the Mayo Clinic

Chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE) results from blows to the head over a period of time that cause concussion (mild traumatic brain injury). These injuries lead to difficulties with thinking (cognition), emotions and behaviors that do not become noticeable until many years later. CTE can lead to physical problems as well. Not everyone who has one or more concussions develops CTE.

CTE involves progressive damage to nerve cells (neurodegenerative disease). The damage results in visible changes to the brain. Some of these changes can be seen with brain imaging, but a diagnosis at this time can be made only on inspection after death (autopsy). Researchers are working to find a way to diagnose CTE in those who have the disease while the individuals are still alive.

Originally called punch drunk syndrome (dementia pugilistica), CTE was first demonstrated in boxers. Doctors now know that other individuals who play a wide variety of sports that involve repeated blows to the head, such as football players, can develop CTE. Military personnel who have had blast injuries also are at risk.

Researchers do not yet fully understand CTE’s prevalence and causes. There is no cure for CTE.

Symptoms of CTE are like those of other conditions that involve progressive loss of function or structure of nerve cells (neurodegenerative diseases), including:

  • Alzheimer’s disease
  • Parkinson’s disease
  • Frontotemporal dementia
  • Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) — also known as Lou Gehrig’s disease

Overall, people with CTE first have problems with thinking (cognition), mood and behavior. Later, they may also develop physical problems.

Military personnel who have experienced traumatic brain injury may experience post-traumatic stress disorder.

Signs and symptoms of CTE usually begin eight to 10 years after repetitive mild traumatic brain injury. These include:

  • Difficulty thinking (cognitive impairment)
  • Impulsive behavior
  • Depression or apathy
  • Short-term memory loss
  • Difficulty planning and carrying out tasks (executive function)
  • Emotional instability
  • Substance abuse
  • Suicidal thoughts or behavior

Over time, memory and executive function may become worse, and other signs and symptoms may develop, including:

  • Irritability
  • Aggression
  • Speech and language difficulties
  • Motor impairment, such as difficulty walking, tremor, loss of muscle movement, weakness or rigidity
  • Trouble swallowing (dysphagia)
  • Vision and focusing problems
  • Trouble with sense of smell (olfactory abnormalities)
  • Dementia

Researchers use the following stages to describe the progression of CTE symptoms:

  • Stage I. Headache, loss of attention and concentration
  • Stage II. Depression, explosivity and short-term memory loss
  • Stage III. Decision-making (executive) dysfunction and cognitive impairment
  • Stage IV. Dementia, word-finding difficulty and aggression

They have also created four stages to describe the process of damage to brain tissue.

CTE causes ongoing pathological changes that once are started, continue to have an effect for years or decades after the original traumatic brain injury or after an individual retires from a sport. Symptoms progress throughout an individual’s life.

CTE progresses in two patterns. In younger people, it may begin with behavior and mood changes, whereas in older people, it may begin with cognitive problems that progress and may lead to dementia. It’s not known whether there are two different disease processes or if the process changes over time.

When to see a doctor

CTE develops over many years, long after repeated mild traumatic brain injury occurs.

However, see your doctor in case of the following:

  • Suicidal thoughts. Some studies report that people with CTE may be at increased risk of suicide. If you have thoughts of hurting yourself, call 911, your local emergency number or the National Suicide Prevention Lifeline at 800-273-TALK (800-273-8255).
  • Head injury. See your doctor if you have had a head injury, even if you didn’t need emergency care. If your child has received a head injury that concerns you, call your child’s doctor immediately. Depending on the signs and symptoms, your doctor may recommend seeking immediate medical care.
  • Memory problems. See your doctor if you have concerns about your memory or other thinking (cognitive) or behavior problems.
  • Personality or mood changes. See your doctor if depression, anxiety, aggression or impulsivity occur.

 

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This is only my experience and journey and not a medical article although I will give resources that I find. This is the second article and will continue as I go. To read the beginning go here 

I am not a doctor or trained in the medical field or an expert. This is only my journey and if you think you have need medical advice suggest going to a doctor or medical facility!

There can be many many causes of Parkinson Pugilistica or  Chronic Traumatic Encephalopathy

 besides military. 

Initial injury

The main cause of CTE is repetitive head trauma. Football players have been the focus of most CTE studies. However, athletes participating in other sports, including soccer, ice hockey, rugby, boxing, wrestling, basketball, field hockey, cheerleading, volleyball and lacrosse, may experience repeated head impacts and also have high rates of concussion.

Blast injuries to military personnel also can result in CTE.

However, not all athletes and not everyone who experiences repeated concussions, including military personnel, go on to develop CTE.

What you need to know about Parkinsonism Pugilistica: The Punch Drunk Syndrome

Part 2 will be about my progression and what caused my Parkinson /CTE

Parkinson

What caused my parkinson

IED

or road side bomb  for me multiple ieds

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